Automatic Lasers

 

Construction laser

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Interior multiline laser

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Plumb laser

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Automatic Levels

 

Digital electronic level

Automatic dumpy level

 

Leica Disto

 

Leica disto D210

Leica disto X310

Leica disto D3aBT

Leica disto D510

Leica disto D810

Disto accessory

 

Laser Calibration 

Laser level repair

 

Cable Locators

 

Leica digicat 550i

Leica digimouse

Leica digitex

Leica digitrace

Pipe locator

Signal clamp

 

Machine Control

 

2D control system

Machine control system

Leica digging system

Universal receiver
 

Rail Alignment

RS 4000 system

 

Total Station

 

Electronic theodolite

Leica total station

Topcon theodolite 

 
 
 
 
 
 
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  Interior Laser:

 

         Leica Rugby 640 Laser Level          Interior Laser Leica Rugby 640

Interior construction laser

Interior Construction Laser TUF HVG

 

Automatic Levelling Interior Green Beam Laser

Geo Fennel FL260VA Green Beam Interior Laser

 
 
Geo Fennel Interior Laser FL240HV

Adapter

Geo Fennel Automatic Self Levellling Construction Laser

Spectra Precision HV301G green laser beam laser  
 

Spectra Precision Laser HV201

Spectra Precision Laser HR320

Spectra Precision Cross Line Laser 1.5PL     

Laser 1.5PL
 

Geo Fennel Rotating & Line laser FL 1000 HP

 
Green Beam Interior Laser    


 

How to look after your laser level?
 
 

When you buy a laser, the first thing to do is to set up your own calibration range. This consists of a fixed support and permanent mark 15-30m away. To check that there is no coning, make an independent check with a calibrated dumpy level or laser that the rotating beam is level on both axis or at least within specification.  

When you buy a laser, the first thing to do is to set up your own calibration range. This consists of a fixed support and permanent mark 15-30m away. To check that there is no coning, make an independent check with a calibrated dumpy level or laser that the rotating beam is level on both axis or at least within specification.  

 

When lasers are knocked over or handled inappropriately, they may well go out of calibration. In such cases or at the start of a new pour for instance, having a calibration range makes it quick and easy to check and if necessary, adjust with minimum delay. Maintain a record and you have saved $5000 for a QA programme!  

 

Some lasers are more robust and survive rough handling better than others, and even more importantly maintain calibration. These are likely to be more expensive but the extra cost may be well worthwhile as missing the fact that your laser level is out of calibration may result in very serious consequences.  

 

Whenever transporting the laser, do so with the items in the carry case. Never leave the case open to gather dust and do not put a wet laser in the case; dry it out first. Just exercise common sense. If the hand held detector gets dust on the plastic sensor window, do not rub it with a dry cloth as this will scratch the plastic and reduce pick up range. With a finger over the sound port, clean off the dust with a damp sponge.  

 

If the detector becomes spattered with cement and you are unable to wipe it clean with a damp sponge quickly enough, then clean off with acid, taking care that none enters the sound port or the battery compartment, and rinse off.  

 

If sited away from the action, you should never get concrete splashes on the transmitter but if you do, clean off with acid and rinse off. Better quality lasers are waterproof except for the battery compartment.  

 

If you go away on holidays, it is best to remove the batteries from both the detector and the laser.  

 

A laser on a tripod is always vulnerable to being knocked over. Make sure the legs are well splayed and pushed securely into the ground and if possible, protect it from the idiots by putting in a couple of stakes or making some sort of barrier round it.  

 

If the laser is to be used for several days, then it is a good idea to mount it on a shelf attached to something solid that is out of the way. This has the virtue of maintaining the same RL every day so you do not have to re-position the hand held detector, often called a "rod eye".  

 

It is best to clamp the rod eye on a 2x1 (50x25) piece of dressed timber rather than a staff unless it is 2m or above. These detectors normally are not as rugged as the laser and seldom survive if the staff crashes over, so it is not a good idea to prop it up against a wall.  

 

Finally, there is the need for looking after the batteries. If using disposable, only use Alkalines as these maintain voltage much better than the cheaper “heavy duty” type. For Nicad, and other rechargeable batteries, best to flatten and then recharge fully (but not to leave on charge for more than is necessary), you could invest in a laser that can use alkaline batteries as well. Always keep a spare in the case so if the laser runs out of voltage during the day, you can use your "emergency back up" without losing production. However you then have to remember to switch back that night and recharge the Nicad .